Some of the Auto punch dies are cone shaped in order to raise the smaller coins up in the housing so the top housing will engage and center the coin. That is all. These should be used cone facing up, flat side down in the pedestal.
The flat auto punch dies can be used either way.
For a fat tire look, you want a relatively small hole (for a wide band), stretch out past your target size more than normal, start reducing with a 17 degree die but quickly switch over to a 25 degree die to finish sizing and shaping.
I’ve boiled down the process to four main steps:
  • punch a hole
  • fold it
  • stretch it
  • reduce it and finish
Lets see, Here is what I would do for a fat tire size 13, half and dollar:
Dollar:
  • punch a 9/16″ hole (wider band, used for larger rings and fat tire look. (I usually would punch a 5/8″ hole for this size ring and the look I like. ))
  • bevel hole using deburring tool to remove stress risers
  • begin to fold with steel starter cone
  • anneal
  • finish folding until coin hits plastic cone/mandrel
  • anneal
  • stretch out 4-5 sizes past target size (anneal as needed. I usually would stretcher 3-4 for a soft rounded look I like))
  • reduce in 17 degree reduction die 1-2 sizes
  • remove excess material on inside reed side with deburring tool
  • finish reducing in a 25 degree reduction die to target size “anneal as needed”
  • reduce cut side to look symmetric only, not size. Sizing is already finished.
  • If you need to reshape, simply stretch and reduce again.
  • “should not need need Swede for this coin and size unless wobbles form or you stretch too much and 17/25 degree dies start to remove detail on coin”
  • file, sand, buff, patina and finish
  • Crack open a cold one and enjoy 😉
Half dollar:
  • punch a 7/16″ hole (wider band, used for larger rings and fat tire look. (I usually would punch a 1/2″ hole for this size ring and the look I like))
  • bevel hole using deburring tool to remove stress risers
  • begin to fold with steel starter cone
  • anneal
  • finish folding until coin hits plastic cone/mandrel
  • anneal
  • stretch out 3-4 sizes past target size (anneal as needed. I usually would stretcher 2-3 for a soft rounded look I like))
  • reduce in 17 degree die 1 size
  • remove excess material on inside reed side with deburring tool
  • finish reducing in a 25 degree die to target size “anneal as needed”
  • reduce cut side to look symmetric only, not size. Sizing is already finished.
  • If you need to reshape, simply stretch and reduce again.
  • “should not need need Swede for this coin and size unless wobbles form or you stretch too much and 17/25 degree dies start to remove detail on coin”
  • file, sand, buff, patina and finish
  • Crack open a cold one and enjoy 😉
On a ring size 11 fat tire, I would go 1/16″ punch size larger on all that is stated above holes. Smaller holes for bigger rings, bigger holes for smaller rings. Make sure to practice on clad coins first. They work similar to silver coins but are much less expensive. I would do clad halves first then work your way up to clad dollars. Then start in on silver halves and then a silver dollar. Get comfortable with the process first before going up to silver, gold, platinum etc.

Here is a vid on the auto punch: